The climate emergency in higher education: working together to meet the challenge of student activism

Authors

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.21100/compass.v14i3.1223

Keywords:

climate change, sustainability, ethics, academic developers, collaboration

Abstract

This conference reflection explores the themes raised by participants in the authors’ interactive workshop at the SHIFT 2021 conference. The workshop focused on how universities are responding to the climate emergency through innovative teaching practices.

References

Cross, I.D. and Congreve, A. (2020) ‘Teaching (super) wicked problems: authentic learning about climate change.’ Journal of Geography in Higher Education. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1080/03098265.2020.1849066 (Accessed: 26 February 2021).

Lazarus, R.J. (2009) ‘Super wicked problems and climate change: restraining the present to liberate the future.' Cornell Law Review, 94, 1153-1233. Available at: https://scholarship.law.georgetown.edu/facpub/159 (Accessed: 26 February 2021).

Levin, K., Cashore, B., Bernstein, S. and Auld, G. (2012) ‘Overcoming the tragedy of super wicked problems: constraining our future selves to ameliorate global climate change.’ Policy Science 45, 123-152. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11077-012-9151-0 (Accessed: 26 February 2021).

SOS (2021) ‘Student Opinion: Climate Change. Students Organising for Sustainability.’ Available at: https://sustainability.nus.org.uk/our-research/our-research-reports/energy-and-climate-change/climate-change-tracker. (Accessed: 26 February 2021).

Downloads

Published

2021-08-18

Issue

Section

Conference Reflection Pieces