A critical assessment of the NMC Horizon reports project

Sonja Grussendorf

Abstract


Horizon reports have been published since 2004. The intended purpose of all these publications, whether taken as a whole or taken individually is “to help educators and thought leaders across the world build upon the innovation happening at their institutions by providing them with expert research and analysis”. The reports are certainly widely cited but there is a lack of critical engagement with them. This paper intends to question hidden assumptions in these reports that may have made the community blind to the need for critical assessments of them.  Specifically, it will discuss how accurate the reports' forecasts are, and in which way that matters; it will inquire into its influence on 'thought leaders and finally, what underlying ideological bias they may subscribe to that the eLearning community needs to be alert to.

Keywords


bias; forecasting; horizon reports; educational technology

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References


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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.21100/compass.v11i1.722

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