Video Use in Reflective Practice: Experience from Educating Speech and Language Therapists

Jane Stokes, Keena Cummins

Abstract


This case study shares the experiences of speech and language therapy lecturers in higher education using video with students and practitioners to support reflective practice. The authors believe that video forms a fundamental role in developing the core skills of health, social and education professionals. Frequently teachers in higher education and students alike present with a reluctance to engage with the use of video. Possible reasons for this are discussed. The importance of careful preparatory and debriefing sessions is emphasized, as is the need for an observation schedule. The key ingredients to ensuring that video is effective as a learning tool as well as the challenges are examined. The experience may well have resonance with others in higher education involved in the development of critical reflection associated with students communication and interaction.


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References


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DOI: https://doi.org/10.21100/compass.v4i7.82

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