Google Classroom: An online learning environment to support blended learning

Kizzy Beaumont

Abstract


Google Classroom is a free web service, providing a collaborative tool allowing users to create virtual classrooms, where by they can post assignments, organise folders, and view documents in real time. Google Classroom was initially adopted by the Student Learning Department at Keele University to create a blended approach to university-wide freestanding academic skills development workshops, providing an online community for students to share and open dialogue around topics discussed during workshops. The aim was to bring students from different faculties together and create a sense of community surrounding enhancement of academic practice. Google Classroom provides an intuitive and accessible interface for both staff and students. From both a student and staff perspective at Keele, feedback was very positive. Students engaged in discussions, answered and posed questions to encourage discussion, and gave feedback on resources. This article will demonstrate how the Student Learning Department at Keele University has used Google Classroom and shared user guidance for colleagues to explore in their own practice.


Keywords


Google; VLE; Virtual Classroom; Blended Learning

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References


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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.21100/compass.v11i2.837

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